Skip to content. | Skip to navigation

Personal tools

Sections
You are here: Home / Teams / Apoptosis and Neurogenetics - B. Mollereau / Mollereau Lab Members

Mollereau Lab Members


 

 

Principal Investigator

 

Pr. Bertrand Mollereau 

Head of the group – Professor ENS de Lyon
Tel: +33 (0)4 72 72 81 63 / Mail: click here

 

Pr. Bertrand Mollereau is the head of the Apoptosis and Neurogenetics group at the Laboratory of Molecular Biology of the Cell at Ecole Normale Supérieure de Lyon (ENSL). In 1997, Dr. Mollereau received his Ph.D. on Immunology from the University of Paris XI in the laboratory of Anna Senik.  He then conducted post-doctoral research with Dr. Claude Desplan in the Laboratory of Molecular Genetics at Rockefeller and New York Universities. In 2001, Dr. Mollereau was appointed Research Assistant Professor in the Strang Laboratory of Apoptosis and Cancer Biology under Dr. Hermann Steller at the Rockefeller University, USA. There, he obtained NIH grant support and headed a junior research group to study photoreceptor development and apoptosis in Drosophila.  Dr. Mollereau joined the faculty as professor at the Ecole Normale Supérieure de Lyon in autumn 2006. In 2008, his group was awarded the ATIP (CNRS) and Fondation pour la Recherche Medical Equipe programmes.  His group is interested in understanding the mechanism of cell death and pathophysiology of neurodegenerative diseases using Drosophila and mouse models.

 


 

Senior Researchers


  


 

Nathalie Davoust–Nataf, Ph.D
Assitant Professor – Maître de Conférence ENS de Lyon

Tel: +33 (0)4 72 72 87 90 / Mail: click here

 

Nathalie Davoust is a “Maître de Conférences” at the Ecole Normale Supérieure de Lyon (ENSL). She is in charge of the Immunology classes for Licence and Master students. Nathalie conducted her Ph.D. in Immunology at the University of Birmingham Alabama (UAB) in Pr Scott Barnum laboratory. She returned back to France in 2000 and joined Fabian Wild group (INSERM U404, Immunity and vaccination) to study measles virus/host interactions in a mouse model of neuro-inflammation. Nathalie Davoust then performed a second post-doctoral fellowship in the laboratory of Marie-Françoise Belin (INSERM U433, Experimental Neurobiology and Physiology) where she pursued her work on the interactions between the nervous and the immune systems in a mouse model of auto-immunity. She joined Pr. Bertrand Mollereau’s team in January 2010 with the objective to use Drosophila as a unique tool for the identifyication of new glial-related factors involved in neurodegenerative diseases. 

 


 

 

Ludivine Walter Ph.D
Assitant Professor – Maître de Conférence UCBL

Tel: +33 (0)4 72 72 85 74 / Mail: click here

 

Ludivine Walter is an Assistant Professor at Claude Bernard Lyon 1 University. She received her Ph. D in Physiology, Nutrition and Physiopathology from Paris VII University under the mentorship of Pr Eric Fontaine. Immediately following her Ph. D, she completed a post doctoral training in Pr. Gyorgy Hajnoczky's lab at the Jefferson Medical School in Philadelphia, USA. Subsequently, she started using model organism in Pr Sylvia Lee's lab at Cornell University, Ithaca, USA, where she was awarded a United Mitochondrial Disease Fellowship to work on mitochondria in aging processes in the nematode C. elegans. An ERG Marie Curie fellowship allowed to pursue her research in Hugo Aguilaniu's lab. She joined Bertrand Mollereau's lab in 2016 to study the role of the mitochondria in cell death and physiopathology. She teaches undergraduate and graduate classes in molecular biology and genetics.

 


 

Research Engineer

 


 

Florence Jollivet
Research engineer –  C.N.R.S

Tel: +33 (0)4 72 72 89 29

 

 

.

 

 


 

Ph.D Students 

 


 

Marianne Sedru
Ph.D Student ARC2 Région Rhone Alpes
Tel: +33 (0)4 72 72 89 29 / Mail:  click here

 

After a bachelor's and a master's degree in teaching biology and geology, Marianne chose to study biology for a second master's degree, named "Therapeutic targets and molecules" at the Muséum National d'Histoire Naturelle, in Paris. Her first internship in a research lab was about the link between Parkinson's disease and new pollutants found in the environment (ie. metabolites of pharmacological drugs) using a zebrafish model. The complexity of the intracellular responses and the pathways involved in Parkinson's disease, fascinated her. Since 2015, she is performing her PhD in Bertrand Mollereau's team, where she is studying the link between pesticides and ER stress on the consequences on hallmarks of Parkinson Disease using a drosophila model.

 

Victor Girard
Ph.D Student ENS Lyon
Tel: +33 (0)4 72 72 81 63 / Mail:  click here

 

Victor is a PhD student who joined the lab in 2016 after a master degree at the ENS of Lyon. During his master degree he studied different cellular processes using various animal model such as cellular senescence in Hydra (Pr. B. Galliot Lab. University of Geneva), stem cell differentiation in planarian (Pr. F. Cebrià Lab., University of Barcelona) and regulated necrosis with Drosophila in Pr. B. Mollereau’s team. He is now studying the transfer of alpha-synuclein between glial cells and neurons in a model of Parkinson disease in Drosophila.

 

Haixiu Jin
Ph.D Student ENS Lyon/ECNU
Tel: +33 (0)4 72 72 89 29 / Mail:  click here

Haixiu JIN is a joint PhD student of ENS-LYON and East China Normal University (ECNU) in Shanghai, China. She received her bachelor’s degree in Tianjin University of Sports in 2013, majoring in medical rehabilitation and exercise. In 2016, Haixiu received her master’s degree on biochemistry and exercise from ECNU, and there, her supervisor was Prof. Shuzhe DING. During the study in ECNU, Haixiu’s research interests mainly focus on ER stress, and she had conducted numerous experiments on training GK (Goto Kakiski Wistar) rats with treadmill to find the influence of exercise on ER stress in T2DM. She joined in Bertrand Mollereau’s lab in 2016, and now she is doing research on the role of the unfolded protein response in the neuroprotection mediated by preconditioning in Drosophila models of Parkinson’s disease.